Rotavirus Vaccine Access and Delivery

Tables | Rotavirus vaccine impact

Download a complete set of the impact tables: English [PPT .7 MB] | French [PPT .4 MB]


Rotavirus vaccines lead to significant reductions in severe and fatal diarrhea in both vaccinated and unvaccinated children

Rotavirus vaccines are saving lives and improving health in countries where children have access to them. Swift and significant declines in hospitalization and deaths due to rotavirus and all-cause diarrhea have been observed in many of the countries that have introduced rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs. Researchers also have found that use of rotavirus vaccines may protect unvaccinated children and adults by reducing transmission of rotavirus from the vaccinated population to unvaccinated members of the community (called “indirect effects” to those unvaccinated and sometimes referred to as “herd immunity” effects). These remarkable results underscore the incredible potential for rotavirus vaccines to improve child health and save children’s lives.

The results for reductions in hospitalizations or deaths in these tables are not generally directly comparable. This is because the different studies vary by study methodology and setting, including ages studied and/or eligible for vaccination, location, vaccine coverage, and years since vaccine implementation. Nonetheless, the results provide evidence of consistent reductions in a variety of settings where rotavirus vaccines have been introduced.


Table 1. Impact of rotavirus vaccines on hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis among children <5 years old

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Table 1 w refs


Table 2. Impact of rotavirus vaccines on hospitalizations for all-cause acute gastroenteritis among children <5 years old

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Table 2 w refs


Table 3. Impact of rotavirus vaccines on deaths for all-cause acute gastroenteritis among children <5 years old

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Table 3. Impact of rotavirus vaccines on deaths for all-cause acute gastroenteritis among children <5 years old


Table 4. Indirect benefits of rotavirus vaccination

Similar to the tables above, the  results for reductions in hospitalizations in this table are not generally comparable because the different studies vary by study methodology and setting, including ages studied and/or eligible for vaccination, location, vaccine coverage, and years since vaccine implementation. Again, the results provide evidence of consistent reductions in hospitalizations among older, unvaccinated children in a variety of settings where rotavirus vaccines have been introduced.

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Table 4. Indirect benefits of rotavirus vaccination

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